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Introduction

This page is concerned with St Alban's Memorial to the citizens of the city and surrounding area who were killed or died as a result of World Wars One and Two.

St Albans is a British town which was established on the west bank of the Ver in the 1st century BC, and subsequently the Romans built their town of Verulamium on the site. In 61 BC the town was sacked by Queen Boudicca. Sections of the town wall dating from the 2nd century BC are still extant, and the town has been extensively excavated.

About 304 a Roman named Alban, who had converted to Christianity, was taken from the town and killed on the east bank of the Ver. An abbey was later founded on the alleged site of his martyrdom, and the town of St. Albans grew up around the abbey. Offa of Mercia about 793 founded a Saxon abbey church on the site of the earlier church, and St. Albans Church (designated a cathedral in 1877) was built, using Roman bricks from the ruins of Verulamium, in 1077 on the site of the church that Offa had built.

St Alban's Abbey

St Alban's Abbey (Stephen Stratford 2007)

The most celebrated Saxon abbot was Ulsinus, who in 948 founded three churches - St. Stephen's, St. Michael's, and St. Peter's - and who planned and laid out the town of St. Albans and founded the market, which is still held. The school (not a monastic school) was already flourishing by 1100, and an early headmaster was Alexander Neckam, a well-known schoolmaster and the foster brother of Richard I. Nicholas Breakspear (later Pope Adrian IV - the only English Pope) was the son of an abbey tenant.

St. Albans and its abbey have played a prominent part in English history. As their power grew, the abbots obtained the right to destroy the Saxon royal borough of Kingsbury, on a neighbouring hilltop, and it finally disappeared in the reign of Stephen. The constant visits of kings and nobles, English and foreign, led to the development of a famous school of history, under the authority first of Roger of Wendover and later of Matthew Paris. In 1213 the first draft of Magna Carta was read to a gathering of clergy and noblemen in the abbey.

In 1381 John Ball, a celebrated preacher and one of the leaders of the Peasants' Revolt, was tried and hanged at St. Albans. During the Wars of the Roses two battles were fought at St. Albans: in 1455 it was the scene of Lancastrian defeat, in 1461 of Yorkist defeat.

Like many other abbeys, St. Albans declined in wealth and importance during the late 15th and early 16th centuries. In 1539 the abbey was dissolved, and St. Albans became a borough, its first charter being dated 1553.

On 26 August 1555, a baker from Barnet called George Tankerfield was bought to St Alban's and burnt at the stake, for refusing to recant his Protestant faith. He was taken from Barnet and executed at St. Albans as an example to local Protestants.

Plaque near the spot where George Tankerfield was executed (Stephen Stratford 2007).

The large rock marks George Tankerfield's Grave (Stephen Stratford 2007).

The abbey lands finally came into the hands of the Bacon family, and Francis Bacon, Viscount St. Albans, is commemorated by a statue in St. Michael's Church. During the English Civil Wars of the mid-17th century, the town was the headquarters of the Parliamentary army of the Earl of Essex.

Many fine old buildings can be seen in present-day St. Albans. The most important industry in the town has been printing. One of the earliest presses was set up in the town by the “Scolemaster Printer,” who operated there from 1479 until 1486. One of his books, The Boke of St. Albans , contains the earliest example of colour printing in England. Printing continues to be significant, together with other light industries such as electrical engineering and the manufacture of musical instruments.

The War Memorial

St Alban's War Memorial (Stephen Stratford 2015)

The First World War names are shown on the panels that run around the base of the main structure.

The Second World War names are shown on the panel that runs around the outside of the flower bed, in the centre of the above picture.

During the Frist World War, the County of Middlesex War Hospital was established in the Middlesex Mental Hospital at Napsbury, near St. Albans, and from 1914 to March 1915 the city of St. Albans was the Headquarters of the 47th London Division. The Second World War saw the Hill End Hospital, St. Albans, taken over by the Military authorities, and service war burials were carried out from this hospital.

First World War

Click here to view a list of the World War One names on the memorial.

There are two Victoria Cross recipients listed on St Albans War Memorial: Alfred Victor Smith and Edward Warner.

Alfred Victor Smith, VC

Alfred Victor Smith (Smith, AV on the memorial) was a 2nd Lieutenant in 1/5 Battalion East Lancashire Regiment. He was killed 23rd December, 1915. Because of his act of self sacrifice he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

The citation for Lieutenant Smith's Victoria Cross was published in the London Gazette, 3 March 1916 (page 2349):

For most conspicuous bravery. He was in the act of throwing a grenade when it slipped from his hand and fell to the bottom of the trench, close to several of our officers and men. He immediately shouted out a warning, and himself jumped clear and into safety; but, seeing that the officers and men were unable to get into cover, and knowing well that the grenade was due to explode, he returned without any hesitation and flung himself down on it. He was instantly killed by the explosion. His magnificent act of self-sacrifice undoubtedly saved many lives.

Lieutenant Smith is believed to be buried in Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery.

The Victoria Cross awarded to Lieutenant Smith is on display in Towneley Hall Museum in Burnley.

Edward Warner, VC

VC commemorative stone to St Albans resident Edward Warner (Stephen Stratford 2015).

Edward Warner was born and raised in St Albans, joining the Bedfordshire Regiment in 1903. Following the completion of his term of service in the regular Army, Warner was transferred to the reserves.

Following the outbreak of the war in August 1914, reservist Edward Warner was mobilised and rejoined the 1st Bedforshire Regiment., entering the "France & Flanders" theatre on 16 August 1914.

On 1 May 1915, Private Warner's battalion was due for relieve but at 6.30 p.m. that evening, a German gas attack was launched against the defenders of the hill. On the right, the 1st Devonshire Regiment lost over 300 men in just moments, leaving the 1st Bedfordshire Regiment on their left flank exposed.

Private Warner's platoon held the right flank of the battalion line on the hill. The psychological effects of a new weapon such as gas, with no real defence against its effects and being under heavy shell fire, Private Warner remained in the trench, fending off all German attempts to gain entry. Once a lull in the fighting allowed, he moved back through the gas cloud, artillery bombardment and machine gun fire to gather reinforcements. Private Warner found some men from his battalion and guided them back into the danger area but soon after returning to the front trenches had to be carried back to the regimental aid post suffering from the effects of prolonged exposure to the gas.

The citation for Private Edward Warner was published in the London Gazette, 29 June 1915 (page 6270):

For most conspicuous bravery near "Hill 60" on 1st May, 1915. After Trench 46 had been vacated by our troops, consequent on a gas attack, Private Warner entered it single-handed in order to prevent the enemy taking possession. Reinforcements were sent to Private Warner, but could not reach him owing to the gas. He then came back and brought up more men, by which time he was completely exhausted, but the trench was held until the enemy's attack ceased. This very gallant soldier died shortly afterwards from the effects of gas poisoning.

Private Warner is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Panels 31 and 33.

The Victoria Cross awarded to Private Warner is on display in the Bedfordhire & Hertfordshire Regimental Museum.

First World War Merchant Navy Casualties

St. Albans War Memorial contains the names of three WWI Merchant Navy casualties who are listed on the Tower Hill Memorial.

J.C. Coleman was a Second Hand aboard the Steam Trawler Ajax (Grimsby). He died on 2 September 1914, aged 40 years, and is buried at sea.

Entry for Appentice Richard Owen (Stephen Stratford 2006).

Apprentice Richard Owen was a crew-member aboard the Highbury (London). He died on 31 May 1917 aged 15.

Entry for Apprentice Edward Baden Sharp (Stephen Stratford 2006).

Apprentice Edward Baden Sharp was a crew-member aboard the Belgian Prince (Newcastle). He died on 31 July 1917 aged 16.

The Belgian Prince was a vessel of the Prince Line. She was built in 1901 by the Sir J. Laing & Sons shipyard. The ship's displacement was 4765 tons with dimensions of 391.1 x 51.2 x 28.5 feet. Her 492 nominal horsepower triple-expansion engines provided a maximum speed of 10.5 knots. The vessel was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine, 175 miles north-west by west of Tory Island; 39 people were killed, with the ship's master taken prisoner.

Town Hall Memorial

Memorial located in Old Town Hall (Stephen Stratford 2015).

The old Town Hall used to contain a memorial to St Albans' residents who lost their live in the First World War. This memorial was recently moved because building work to redevelop the old Town Hall into a new museum and art gallery. The memorial is now mounted on a wall in the front of the chamber at St Albans City and District Council.

Local Resident Tablets

St Albans also has several name plaques located in areas of the City where the citizens resided before enlisting in the armed forces.

One of the plaques located in St Albans (Stephen Stratford 2007)

All of the names appear on the War Memorial.

One of the First World War names shown on the memorial is 7602 Private E Warner of the 1st Battalion, The Bedfordshire Regiment. Edward Warner was born (the son of Mark and Charlotte M. Warner) and resided in St Albans, prior to enlisting into the Bedfordshire Regiment.

Private Warner (aged 31) has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial(Panels 31 and 33). His Victoria Cross is on public display at the Bedfordshire & Hertfordshire Regimental Museum (Luton, Bedfordshire).

Second World War

Click here to view a list of the World War Two names on the memorial.

St. Albans War Memorial contains the names of two WWII Merchant Navy casualties who are listed on the Tower Hill Memorial.

Entry for Apprentice Peter Derek Gramson (Stephen Stratford 2006).

Apprentice Peter Derek Gramson was a crew-member aboard the Aymeric (Glasgow). He died on 16 May 1943 aged 17.

The Aymeric was a vessel of the Andrew Weir & Co company. She was built in 1919 by the R. Thompson & Sons shipyard. The ship's displacement was 5196 tons with dimensions of 400 x 52 x 29 feet. Her 520 nominal horsepower triple-expansion engines provided a maximum speed of 11 knots. The vessel was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine in the North Atlantic; 53 of her crew of 78 were killed.

Entry for Cyril Jabez Green (Stephen Stratford 2006).

Fourth Engineer Cyril Jabez Green was a crew-member aboard the Aska (London). He died on 16 September 1940 aged 26.

The Aska was a vessel of the British India Steam Company. She was built in 1939 by the Swan Hunter shipyard. The ship's displacement was 8323 tons with dimensions of 444.6 x 61.2 x 25.2 feet. Her 2155 nominal horsepower turbine engines provided a maximum speed of 19 knots.

The Aska left Bathurst (West Africa) for Liverpool on 7 September 1940, with 350 French troops on board. Due to being able to maintain a speed of 17 knots the Aska did not sail in convoy. At 02:30 am on 16 September 1940, when between Rathlin Island and Maiden's Rock, the vessel was attacked by a German bomber which scored two hits in, or near, the engine room. After a third bomb hit the forecastle, the order to abandon ship was given. A total of 6 officers and 6 lascars were killed.

Hertfordshire Yeomanry

Inside the Abbey is a plaque commemorating those members of the Hertfordshire Yeomany that died during World War One. The details are reproduced below.

Name
Rank
Number
Death
Date
Theatre
Cemetery
Abbott, DG
Trooper
1450
DoW
24/08/1915
At Sea
?
Aley. F
Trooper
2126
Died
04/01/1916
Home
Thetford Cemetery
Archer, G
Trooper
105805
Died
20/07/1917
Egypt
Alexandria War Cemetery
Arnold, AW
L/Sgt
105019
DoW
18/09/1918
India
Delhi 1914-1918 War Memorial
Atkins, PA
L/Sgt
2297
Died
23/11/1915
Home
St Albans Cemetery
Barnard, WJ
Trooper
2413
Died
08/07/1916
At Sea
Basra Memorial
Barratt, CJ
Trooper
2503
Died
29/11/1915
Home
Colchester Cemetery
Best, E
Trooper
105601
Died
08/10/1918
Egypt
Cairo War Cemetery
Brand, J
Trooper
1149
KIA
14/09/1915
Gallipoli
Green Hill Cemetery
Bridle, A
Trooper
1651
KIA
21/08/1915
Gallipoli
Green Hill Cemetery
Brown, SH
Trooper
106484
?
03/04/1919
Palestine
Damascus War Cemetery
Buckel, SE
L/Cpl
1445
KIA
18/09/1915
Gallipoli
Green Hill Cemetery
Carlile, EHH
Major
-
KIA
22/03/1918
-
Arras Memorial
Carroll, ES
L/Sgt
1241
KIA
21/08/1915
Gallipoli
Helles Memorial
Clark, JW
L/Cpl
105748
Died
11/02/1919
Home
Thorley Churchyard
Clarke, F
Trooper
105809
Died
28/11/1918
Palestine
Damascus War Cemetery
Clayton, GE
L/Cpl
1214
DoW
23/08/1915
Gallipoli
Lala Baba Cemetery
Collins, A
Trooper
1969
KIA
24/08/1915
Gallipoli
Helles Memorial
Cooke, H
L/Cpl
1433
KIA
21/08/1915
Gallipoli
Green Hill Cemetery
Cooper, MW
?
?
?
?
?
?
Culverhouse, HH
Trooper
105787
Died
29/05/1917
Mesopotamia
Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery
Davies, A
Trooper
1824
Died
19/10/1915
Egypt
Cairo War Cemetery
Deards, E
Trooper
105859
Died
13/12/1917
Mesopotamia
Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery
Dell, WG
S/S Cpl
105538
Died
22/09/1918
Egypt
Kantara War Cemetery
Dwyer, C
Trooper
2716
Died
11/04/1916
Home
Brighton Borough Cemetery
East, AG
SQMS
105088
Died
13/06/1918
Egypt
Suez War Cemetery
Ellacott, SA
Cpl
1164
Died
04/06/1915
Egypt
Alexandria War Cemetery
Everett, HJ
Trooper
31096
KIA
08/10/1918
F&F
?
Farr, P
Trooper
106008
Died
11/07/1917
Mesopotamia
?
Gingell, JS
Trooper
1751
DoW
27/08/1915
At Sea
Helles Memorial
Gough, JR
Trooper
105756
Died
07/11/1918
Egypt
Alexandria War Cemetery
Griffiths, AF
Trooper
1551
Died
01/06/1916
Mesopotamia
Basra War Cemetery
Hall, S
Trooper
2345
Died
26/07/1916
Mesopotamia
Amara War Cemetery
Hallum, EE
Trooper
2748
Died
12/11/1918
India
Madras 1914-1918 War Memorial
Harradine, RG
Trooper
1763
DoW
27/08/1915
At Sea
Helles Memorial
Harrowell, F
Trooper
105849
Died
03/10/1918
Palestine
Ramleh War Cemetery
Hickman, FH
A/Sgt
1949
Died
19/12/1916
Home
Bells Hill Burial Ground
Holgate, AHE
Trooper
105571
Died
24/12/1918
Egypt
Kantara War Cemetery
Howard, WH
Trooper
2438
Died
27/10/1916
Mesopotamia
Amara War Cemetery
Humphreys, WS
Trooper
1740
DoW
23/08/1915
Gallipoli
Lala Baba Cemetery
Jolly, F
Lieu
-
Died
20/08/1918
-
Redbourn Churchyard
Jones, AS
Trooper
1645
DoW
23/08/1915
At Sea
Helles Memorial
Kempster, J
Trooper
105757
Died
22/10/1918
Palestine
Damascus War Cemetery
Knowlton, JH
Sgt
105832
KIA
16/11/1917
East Africa
Dar es Salaam War Cemetery
Lovesay, B
Trooper
1880
KIA
21/08/1915
Gallipoli
Green Hill Cemetery
Mason, HD
Trooper
2462
Died
29/08/1916
Mesopotamia
Amara War Cemetery
Masson, J
Trooper
1425
KIA
15/09/1915
Gallipoli
Green Hill Cemetery
Matthews, AE
Trooper
106074
Died
24/07/1917
Mesopotamia
Amara War Cemetery
Matthews, L
Trooper
106060
Died
05/09/1917
Mesopotamia
Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery
Millar, HP
Trooper
1725
KIA
18/09/1915
Gallipoli
Green Hill Cemetery
Miller, H
Trooper
2082
Died
16/08/1915
At Sea
Green Hill Cemetery
Paddon, HL
Trooper
1768
KIA
07/09/1915
Gallipoli
Green Hill Cemetery
Rudd, WJ
Trooper
106079
Died
10/12/1918
Egypt
Beirut War Cemetery
Sheppard, SG
Lieu-Col
-
DoW
21/08/1915
-
Green Hill Cemetery
Smith, SA
Trooper
2330
Died
04/06/1916
Mesopotamia
Basra War Cemetery
Smith, WA
Trooper
2045
Died
21/02/1917
F&F
St Sever Cemetery Extension
Stevens, S
L/Cpl
1299
DoW
20/09/1915
Home
Leavesden Churchyard
Walder, FJW
Sgt
105183
Died
17/10/1918
Egypt
Alexandria War Cemetery
Wall, HW
Trooper
1487
Died
19/07/1916
Egypt
?
Ward, CW
Trooper
2542
Died
04/05/1916
Egypt
?
Whitting, EJ
L/Cpl
1482
Died
14/11/1915
Malta
Pieta Military Cemetery
Wilshaw, DG
Trooper
1988
Died
29/09/1915
At Sea
Helles Memorial
Woodman, TF
Trooper
2412
Died
29/11/1916
Home
St Albans Cemetery
Woods, AR
Trooper
1752
Died
16/06/1916
Mesopotamia
Basra War Cemetery

However, the publication "Soldiers Died in the Great War" lists four additional soldiers, present in the Hertfordshire Yeomany, who are not listed on the Plaque. Their presence in the Hertfordshire Yeomany is also confirmed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Name
Rank
Number
Death
Date
Theatre
Cemetery
Douglas, JW
Trooper
18086
Died
27/10/1918
India
Delhi War Cemetery
Ekins, JCR
Trooper
17649
Died
23/10/1917
India
Port Said War Cemetery
Scotcher, J
Trooper
13991
Died
15/04/1917
Egypt
Chatby Memorial
Slow, G
Trooper
13999
Died
15/04/1917
Egypt
Chatby Memorial

The Grimston Family

The Grimston faily has two plaques on the abby wall dedicated to various family members.

The first plaque is dedicated to memory of Francis A. Grimston, who was a Midshipman aboard HMS Bonaventure, who died of Thypoid fever at Mauritius on 19 August 1895 aged 18.

The second plaque is dedicated to the memory of Captain Horace Sylvester Grimston, a member of the 2nd Battalion Wiltshire Regiment. He was killed in action on 21 October 1914 during the retreat to the town of Ypres. He is buried in Buttes New British Cemetery (Polygon Wood).

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