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Introduction

This page contains the details of agents who operated behind enemy lines in various countries and were awarded the George Cross for their bravery. In the vast majority of cases, the George Cross was awarded posthumously.

Arthur Banks

Arthur Banks was born on 6 October 1923 in Llandulas (North Wales), the son of Charles Chaplin and Harriet Margaret Banks. His father, Captain Charles Banks, was a distinguished pilot in the First World War who was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for his wartime service. Banks attended St Edward's School, Oxford until 1941.

At the time of the award of his posthumous George Cross, Arthur Banks was a Sergeant in 112 Squadron RAF (VR). As in the case of Flight Sergeant Woodbridge, the events surrounding the death of this very gallant airman only emerged after a post-WWII investigation and subsequent war crimes trial.

On 29 August 1944, Sergeant Banks was the pilot in a Mustang aircraft that took part in an armed reconnaissance of the Ravenna and Ferrara areas. Due to suffering hits from anti-aircraft fire, Sergeant Banks was forced to land his aircraft. He decided, after the aircraft had been destroyed, to try and reach the Allied lines.

He made contact with a group of partisans, among whom he became an outstanding figure for his advice and encouragement in action against the Germans. Early in December 1944, a crossing by boat into Allied territory was planned, but the whole party was captured by German and Italian Black Brigade pro-Axis militia.

After repeatedly stating just his name, rank and number, Sergeant Banks was badly beaten and repeatedly whipped on his back with ox thongs. This treatment continued for 6 days, with Sergeant Banks continuing to refuse to divulge any information apart from his name, rank and number.

After completely failing to break Sergeant Banks, the German forces handed the badly tortured remains over to the Black Brigade forces at Artiano ne Polisine Barracks. After again failing to obtain any information from Sergeant Banks, his naked, battered body was doused in petrol and set on fire. Believing Sergeant Banks to be dead, his body was dumped into the River Po.

Despite his torture and what must have been agonising pain, Sergeant Banks managed to some how swim to the bank of the River. Unfortunately, it was the barracks' side of the River and he was almost immediately recaptured by the Black Brigade militia. Sergeant Banks was dragged back to the Barracks.

On 20 December 1944, Sergeant Banks was killed by a shot in the back of his head. He was aged 22 years' old. Banks' remains were initially dumped into a dung heap.

After the war, Sergeant Banks was buried in Argenta Gap War Cemetery, grave reference III.A.7. The inscription on his gravestone reads "The righteous are in the hands of God and there shall no torment touch them".

The citation for the posthumous award of the George Cross to Sergeant Banks was published in the London Gazette on 5 November 1946:

On 2th August, 1944, this airman took part in an armed reconnaissance of the Ravenna and Ferrara areas. During the sortie, his. aircraft was damaged by anti-aircraft fire and he was compelled to make a forced landing.

After the aircraft had been destroyed, Sergeant Banks decided to try to reach the Allied lines. He made contact with a group of Italian partisans, amongst whom, during the following months, he became an outstanding figure, advising and encouraging them in action against the enemy. Early in December, 1944, an attempt at crossing into allied territory by boat was planned. Sergeant Banks and a number of partisans assembled at the allotted place, but the whole party was surrounded and captured.

Sergeant Banks was handed over to the German commander of the district, who presided at his interrogation. During the questioning, Sergeant Banks was cruelly tortured. At one stage, he succeeded in getting hold of a light machine gun, with which he might have killed most of his captors, had not one of the partisans, fearing more severe torture, intervened and pinned his arms to his sides. Sergeant Banks was badly knocked about before he was taken to another prison.

On 8th December, 1944, Sergeant Banks was taken, with a number of partisans, to a prison at Adria. He remained there until 19th December, 1944, when he was handed over to the commander of a detachment of the "Black Brigade". He was then transferred to another prison at Ariano Polesine.

Here, in the presence of Italian Fascists, he was stripped of his clothing and again tortured. Sergeant Banks was eventually bound and thrown into the River Po. Despite his wounds, even at this stage, he succeeded in reaching the river bank. The Fascists then took him back to the prison, where he was shot through the head.

At the time of his capture, Sergeant Banks was endeavouring to return to the Allied lines, so that he might arrange for further supplies to the partisans. He endured much suffering with stoicism, withholding information which would have been of vital interest to the enemy. His courage and endurance were such that they impressed even his captors. Sergeant Banks conduct was, at all times, in keeping with the highest traditions of the Service, even in the face of most brutal and inhuman treatment.

On 6 November 1946, The Times newspaper contained the following article about Arthur Banks:

On August 29, 1944, Sergeant Banks took part in an armed reconnaissance of the Ravenna and Ferrara areas. During the sortie his aircraft was damaged and he was compelled to make a forced landing. Sergeant Banks decided to try to reach the allied lines and made contact with a group of Italian partisans, among whom, during the following months, he became an outstanding figure, advising and encouraging them in action against the enemy.

Early in December 1944, while attempting to cross into allied territory by boat, Sergeant Banks and a number of partisans were surrounded and captured. Sergeant Banks was handed over to the German commander of the district, who presided at his interrogation. During the questioning Sergeant Banks was cruelly tortured. At one stage he succeeded in getting hold of a light machine-gun, with which he might have killed most of his captors, had not one of the partisans, fearing more severe torture, intervened and pinned his arms to his sides. Sergeant Banks was badly knocked about before he was taken to another prison.

On 19 December 1944, he was handed over to the "Black Brigade" and transferred to another prison at Ariano Polesine. Here, in the presence of Italian Fascists, he was stripped of his clothing and again tortured. Sergeant Banks was eventually bound and thrown into the River Po. In spite of his wounds he succeeded in reaching the river bank. The Fascists then took him back to the prison, where he was shot through the head.

Sergeant Banks endured much suffering with stoicism, withholding information which would have been of vital interest to the enemy. His courage and endurance were such that they impressed even his captors.

Albert-Marie Edmond Guérisse

Guérisse was born in Molenbeek, a district of Brussels, on 5 April 1911.

On 25 April 1941, during a mission to place agents in Collioure, Guérisse was in the skiff on its way back to the ship when it capsized and he had to swim ashore. To the Vichy French coast guards who captured him, Guérisse claimed he was a Canadian airman named Pat O'Leary. Both for security in Vichy France and for consistency in his story, Guérisse decided to continue with the O'Leary alias while he remained ashore in France.

When the Vichy France authorities captured the chief of the escape line, Guérisse took over as the chief of the escape line. Guérisse expanded the reach of the escape line's operations, eventually passing over 600 escapees to the UK via Spain.

In 1943 the escape line was infiltrated, and Guérisse was arrested in Toulouse. Guérisse told nothing to the Gestapo interrogators when he was tortured and then was sent to a series of concentration camps.

In the summer of 1944, he was at the Natzweiler-Struthof concentration camp with another SOE agent, Brian Stonehouse. At the camp he witnessed the arrival of four other female SOE agents Andrée Borrel, Vera Leigh, Diana Rowden, and Sonya Olschanezky, who were all executed. After the war, Guérisse and Stonehouse were able to testify at the Nazi war crimes trials as to the women's fate.

Finally, Guérisse was taken to the Dachau concentration camp, tortured again and then sentenced to death. On 30 April 1945, he was chosen as the first president of the International Prisoners' Committee that administered the camp after liberation.

The UK awarded Guérisse the George Cross, although the citation published in the London Gazette on 5 November 1946 used his alias.

Lieutenant-Commander O'Leary was captured by the French police during operations off the south coast of France in April, 1941. He escaped whilst en route to a French prison, and thereupon set up an organisation to help the escape of Allied prisoners of war and evaders. Through his skill and his sustained personal bravery, the organisation succeeded, between April and August, 1941, in getting away some 150 officers and men, many belonging to the Royal Air Force. At increased risk to himself, Lieutenant-Commander O'Leary was soon forced to expand his organisation, to help an everincreasing number of evaders. To keep the members working at full pressure, and to inspire their confidence, he travelled frequently between the Dutch border and the south of France through numerous German controls, himself escorting numbers of escapers. If any question arose of hazard greater than usual, Lieutenant-Commander O'Leary carried out the work himself. In March, 1943, he was betrayed to the Gestapo by a member of his group. Arrested, he was put to many forms of torture in an attempt to make him reveal the names, whereabouts and duties of the other members. He was put in a refrigerator for four hours, he was beaten continually, but never did he disclose information which could be of profit to the enemy. After more ferocious experiments the Germans gave him up as hopeless, and sent him to a Concentration Camp where he was once again the victim of torture. He was a prisoner in Mauthausen, Natzweiler, Neubremm and finally Dachau. He nearly lost his life in the Neubremm quarries, where he was beaten insensible.

Throughout his time in prison, Lieutenant-Commander O'Leary's courage never faltered. Numbers of prisoners have given evidence that his moral and physical influence and support saved their lives. On his liberation from Dachau, Lieutenant-Commander O'Leary refused to leave the Camp, where he had been made "President" of all the prisoners (including some thousands of Russians), until he had ensured that all possible steps had been taken to ease the lot of his fellows. He was then given the opportunity to return to his family, but he insisted on proceeding to France, to trace the surviving members of his organisation, and to help them in any way he could. From the time of inception until the end of the war, Lieutenant-Commander O'Leary's group was responsible for the rescue and successful return of over 600 British and American officers and men. It is now known that over 250 owe their safety directly to Lieutenant-Commander O'Leary, whose fortitude and determination matched every task and risk.

Albert-Marie Guérisse died in Waterloo, Belgium on 26 March 1989, aged 77.

Noor Inayat-Khan

Noor Inayat-Khan was born on 1 January 1914, in Moscow. She became a Assistant Section Officer in the Women's Auxiliary Air Force, seconded to the Women's Transport Service.

Inayat-Khan was the first women radio operator to be infiltrated into enemy occupied France, on 16 June 1943. During the weeks immediately following her arrival, the Gestapo made mass arrests in the Paris Resistance Groups to which she had been detailed, but although given the opportunity to return to England, she refused to abandon what had become the principal and most dangerous post in France. She was a wireless operator and did not wish to leave her French comrades without communications and she hoped also to rebuild her group.

The Gestapo did their utmost to catch her and so break the last remaining link with London. After three and a half months she was betrayed, taken to Gestapo Headquarters in the Avenue Foch and asked to co-operate. She refused to give them information of any kind and was imprisoned in the Gestapo HQ, remaining there for several weeks, and making two unsuccessful attempts to escape during that time. She was asked to sign a declaration that she would make no further attempts but refused, so was sent to Germany for 'safe custody'.

She was imprisoned at Karlsruhe in November 1943 and later at Pforsheim, where her cell was apart from the main prison as she was considered a particularly dangerous and unco-operative prisoner. She still refused to give any information about either her work or comrades.

On 12 September 1944 Noor (together with Yolande Beekman, Eliane Plewman and Madeleine Damerment) were taken to Dachau Concentration Camp and shot on the following day.

Noor Inayat Khan's George Cross was published in the London Gazette on 5 April 1949:

Assistant Section Officer INAYAT-KHAN was the first woman operator to be infiltrated into enemy occupied France, and was landed by Lysander aircraft on 16th June, 1943.

During the weeks immediately following her arrival, the Gestapo made mass arrests in the Paris Resistance groups to which she had been detailed. She refused however to abandon what had become the principal and most dangerous post in France, although given the opportunity to return to England, because she did not wish to leave her French comrades without communications and she hoped also to rebuild her group. She remained at her post therefore and did the excellent work which earned her a posthumous Mention in Despatches.

The Gestapo had a full description of her, but knew only her code name "Madeleine". They deployed considerable forces in their effort to catch her and so break the last remaining link with London. After 3 months she was betrayed to the Gestapo and taken to their H.Q. in the Avenue Foch. The Gestapo had found her codes and messages and were now in a position to work back to London. They asked her to co-operate, but she refused and gave them no information of any kind. She was imprisoned in one of the cells on the 5th floor of the Gestapo H.Q. and remained there for several weeks during which time she made two unsuccessful attempts at escape. She was asked to sign a declaration that she would make no further attempts but she refused and the Chief of the Gestapo obtained permission from Berlin to send her to Germany for "safe custody". She was the first agent to be sent to Germany.

Assistant Section Officer INAYAT-KHAN was sent to Karlsruhe in November; 1943, and then to Pforsheim where her cell was apart from the main prison. She was considered to be a particularly dangerous and unco-operative prisoner. The Director of the prison has also been interrogated and has confirmed that Assistant Section Officer INAYAT-KHAN, when interrogated by the Karlsruhe Gestapo, refused to give any information whatsoever, either as to her work or her colleagues

She was taken with three others to Dachau Camp on the 12th September, 1944. On arrival, she was taken to the crematorium and shot. Assistant Section Officer INAYAT-KHAN displayed the most conspicuous courage, both moral and physical over a period of more than 12 months.

Inayat-Khan

Noor Inayat-Khan is commemorated at the Runnymede Memorial on Panel Number 243.

Arthur Frederick Crane Nicholls

Arthur Frederick Crane Nicholls was born on 8 February 1911 the son of Joseph Crane and Josephine Crane Nicholls. At the time of the events which ended with the posthumous award of the George Cross, Nicholls was a Brigadier in the Coldstream Guards, attached to the Special Operations Executive (SOE).

In October 1943, Brigadier Nicholls was parachuted into Albania to assist with resistance activities against the German forces then occupying Albania. After the German forces attacked the resistance group in December 1943, Brigadier Nicholls was forced into the Albanian mountains. During the harse winter conditions, Brigadier Nicholls developed frost-bite which became so severe in both his legs that he ordered that both his legs be amputated. This operation was performed without any anaesthetic and by a medically unqualified man. After the operation, Brigadier Nicholls was dragged by two other members of his group as he wished to impart essential information to the Allied authorities.

However, the weather conditions and Brigadier Nicholls medical condition worsen. On 11 February 1944 Brigadier Nicholls died aged 33 years' old.

Brigadier Nicholls is buried within Tirana Park Memorial Cemetery, Albania. The inscription on the gravestone is the Latin phrase "Nulli Secundus" or "Second to None".

Brig. Nicholls Grave

The grave of Brigadier A.F.C. Nicholls, GC, ERD (Barry Riley 2009).

Brigadier Nicholls' George Cross award was published in the London Gazette on 26 February 1946:

The KING has been graciously pleased to approve the posthumous award of the GEORGE GROSS, in recognition of most conspicuous gallantry in carryingout hazardous work in a very brave manner, to:

Major (temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) (acting Brigadier) Arthur Frederick Crane NICHOLLS (62269), Coldstream Guards (London).

David Russell

David Russell was born on 30 March 1911 in Ayrshire (Scotland), the son of James and Jessie Russell. At the time of the events leading to his posthumous George Cross award, David Russell was a Lance-Corporal in the 22nd (Motorised) Battalion, New Zealand Infantry.

Like so many other escaped prisoners-of-war, Lance-Corporal Russell had obtained civilian clothes and was living with an Italian peasant, Giuseppe Vettorello. He was well-known and liked by the people of the locality. According to Giuseppe Vettorello, Lance-Corporal Russell maintained contact with a number of other ex-prisoners-of-war, visiting them regularly by bicycle.

On 22 February 1945, Lance-Corporal Russell was arrested by a patrol of Italian Fascist troops near the house of Giuseppe Vettorello. Giuseppe Vettorello was also arrested on suspicion of having harboured Lance-Corporal Russell. Their captors were members of a mixed German-Italian police regiment. Both prisoners were taken to the Headquarters of Oberleutnant Haupt at Ponte di Piave.

Here an attempt was made to force Lance-Corporal Russell to betray Giuseppe Vettorello, but he refused to do so, denying that he had ever seen him before. According to an Italian soldier who was present, Lance-Corporal Russell was beaten up by Haupt, but maintained his silence. Thanks to Lance-Corporal Russell's loyalty, Giuseppe Vettorello was released.

The Germans were evidently convinced that Lance-Corporal Russell had been in contact with other ex-POWs and Partisans, and were determined that he should disclose their whereabouts. He was chained to a wall in a stable, and told that, unless he gave the required information within three days, he would be shot. Again, on the testimony of two Italians who were present, Lance-Corporal Russell was beaten up, but he resolutely refused to speak.

A civilian who took him food tried to persuade him to save his life, but he replied, "Let them shoot me". Haupt's interpreter, an Italian says: "The behaviour of the Englishman was splendid, and it won the admiration of Haupt himself".

On the third day, 28 February 1945, Lance-Corporal Russell was shot. He was 34 years' old.

After the war, Lance-Corporal Russell's remains were exhumed and on 22 October 1945 reburied in Udine War Cemetery, Italy in Plot IV, Row D, Grave 2.

Lance-Corporal Russell's award of the George Cross was published in the London Gazette on Christmas Eve 1948:

The KING has been graciously pleased, on the advice of His Majesty's New Zealand Ministers, to approve the award of the GEORGE CROSS, in recognition of gallant and distinguished services whilst a prisoner of war in German hands (prior to September, 1945) to:

No. 30169 Lance-Corporal David RUSSELL (deceased), 2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force.

On 29 December 1948, The Times newspaper contained the following information about David Russell:

The award of the George Cross to Lance-Corporal David Russell, of 22 Battalion, 2nd NZEF, was for an act of loyalty and gallantry which cost him his life before a German firing squad in Italy in February 1945.

Russell was working in Hawkes Bay before the war and joined up on the day that war broke out. He went into camp soon afterwards and sailed with the 2nd Echelon.

He was born in Scotland, where his Father and Sisters now live. Russell was captured in the Western Desert in July 1942, before El Alamein. He was taken to Italy and, after escaping from a prison camp, lived with a peasent family, meanwhile keeping in touch with other prisoners of war living in similar fashion near by. He was captured by Italian troops in February 1945 and handed over to the Germans, who beat him up. Russell kept his silence and refused to incriminate his shelterer, who was arrested at the same time but was released when Russell refused to acknowledge he knew him.

The Germans, who were convinced that Russell had been in touch with other prisoners, chained him to a stable wall with the ultimatum that he would be shot in three days if he did not give the required information. Russell resolutely resfused to speak and told his warder "Let them shoot me". After further beatings he was shot on the third day.

The official report says there can be no doubt that Russell, in the midst of enemies and in face of death, bore himself with courage and dignity of a very high degree. He was a hero to the local Italians, who put an expensive headstone over his grave.

Odette Marie Céline Sansom

Mrs. Odette Marie Céline Sansom (later Churchill, then Hallowes) was born on 28 April 1912.

Mrs. Sansom was infiltrated into enemy occupied France in October 1942 and worked with great courage and distinction until April 1943 when she and her commanding officer were arrested. On their way to Fresnes Prison they managed to talk together and agreed that for their mutual protection they should maintain that they were married. She stuck to this story and even succeeded in convincing her captors, in spite of considerable contrary evidence and through at least 14 interrogations. She also drew Gestapo attention from her commanding officer (Captain Peter Churchill) to herself, saying that he had only come to France on her insistence and even agreed that it should be herself and hot her commanding officer who should be shot.

The Gestapo were most determined to discover the location of a wireless operator and another British Officer whose lives were of the greatest value to the Resistance organisation. Mrs. Sansom was the only person who had this information but although she was subjected to every sort of indignity and cruelty, she never gave anything away and by her bravery and determination not only saved the lives of the two officers but also enabled them to carry on their most valuable work.

She was in solitary confinement for 2 years and whilst in Ravensbrück Concentration Camp was kept in complete darkness for 3 months and 11 days, as a punishment for the Allied landings in the south of France.

Ultimately, she was taken by the German Camp Commandant to the nearest American unit in May 1945.

Odette returned to England in 1945, although her health had been badly affected by her period of imprisonment and torture. A medical report produced, in 1945, by the doctor treating her stated that "... she was in a state of high nervous tension due to maltreatment received in German captivity. Some nails on her toes were missing; there was on her back a rounded scar of about half an inch diameter, the result of a burn deliberately inflicted in the concentration camp".

Odette's Medals

Odette's medals in the Imperial War Museum (Stephen Stratford 2005).

Her award of the George Cross was published in the London Gazette on 20 August 1946:

Mrs. Sansom was infiltrated into enemy occupied France and worked with great courage and distinction until April, 1943, when she was arrested with her Commanding Officer. Between Marseilles and Paris on the way to the prison at Fresnes, she succeeded in speaking to her Commanding Officer and for mutual protection they agreed to maintain that they were married.

She adhered to this story and even succeeded in convincing her captors in spite of considerable contrary evidence and through at least fourteen interrogations. She also drew Gestapo attention from her Commanding Officer on to herself saying that he had only come to France on her insistence. She took full responsibility and agreed that it should be herself and not her Commanding Officer who should be shot.

By this action she caused the Gestapo to cease paying attention to her Commanding Officer after only two interrogations. In addition the Gestapo were most determined to discovier the whereabouts of a wireless operator and of another British officer whose lives were of the greatest value to the Resistance Organisation. Mrs. Sansom was the only person who knew of their whereabouts. The Gestapo tortured her most brutally to try to make her giveaway this information. They seared her back with a red hot iron and, when, that failed, they pulled out all her toe-nails.

Mrs. Sansom, however, continually refused to speak and by her bravery and determination, she not only saved the lives ofthe two officers but also enabled them to carry on their most valuable work. During the period of over two years in which she was in enemy hands, she displayed courage and endurance.

Before her capture, Odette had met and fallen in love with another SOE man: Captain Peter Churchill. They were captured together, but both survived and married in 1947. The couple divorced in 1953 and Odette became Mrs Geoffrey Hallowes in 1956.

Odette Hallowes died on 13 March 1995 at her Walton-on-Thames home aged 82.

Violette Reine Elizabeth Szabo

Violette Reine Elizabeth Szabo was born on 26 June 1921 in the British Military Hospital in Paris of an English father and a French mother.  She went to school in both England and France. Her family seat in France was a little village called Pont Remy, not far from Abbeville and right on the Somme. She boarded for a time in Abbeville right next to a park now contains Abbeville's library.

During World War II, Violette Szabo lived, together with her parents and daughter in Burnley Road, Stockwell, London SW9. She was an Ensign in the Women's Transport Service (FANY).

Violette Szabo volunteered for a particularly dangerous mission in France during April 1944, when she acted as a courier to a Frenchman who had survived the break-up of his circuit based on Rouen and was trying to reconstitute a group in this strategically important area. She had to travel from Paris to Rouen, contacting certain people believed to have remained unmolested and report back to her chief in Paris. She accomplished this dangerous task successfully and after about 6 weeks returned to England.

On D-Day plus one, 7 June 1944, she was dropped into France again.

Soon after her parachute landing, Szabo and her French guide were ambushed by a German patrol and wounded. Szabo insisted that her guide should escape while he could, and she herself was captured and taken first to Limoges and then to Paris. After brutal interrogations over several weeks when she divulged nothing, she was put on a train for Germany. On the journey while an air raid was in progress and the guards ran for shelter, she managed, despite being chained by the ankle to another prisoner, to carry a bottle of water to badly wounded British officers in a cattle truck. Unknown to each other, this group of officers included Yeo-Thomas.

Imprisonment at Ravensbrück Concentration Camp followed and then two spells in labour camps, working under impossible conditions.

Between 25 January and 5 February 1945, Violette Szabo was returned to Ravensbrück and shot together with two other agents: Lilian Rolfe and Danielle Block. The execution scene was later described in an April 1946 interrogation of one of the German onlookers, the second-in-command at Ravensbrück.

Violette Szabo's award of the George Cross was published in the London Gazette on 17 December 1946:

Madame Szabo volunteered to undertake a particularly dangerous mission in France. She was parachuted into France in April, 1944, and undertook the task with enthusiasm. In her execution of the delicate researches entailed she showed great presence of mind and astuteness.

She was twice arrested by the German security authorities but each time managed to get away. Eventually, however, with other members of her group, she was surrounded by the Gestapo in a house in the south west of France. Resistance appeared hopeless but Madame Szabo, seizing a Sten-gun and as much ammunition as she could carry, barricaded herself in part of the house and, exchanging shot for shot with the enemy, killed or wounded several of them. By constant movement, she avoided being cornered and fought until she dropped exhausted.

She was arrested and had to undergo solitary confinement. She was then continuously and atrociously tortured. But never by word or deed gave away any of her acquaintances or told the enemy anything of any value. She was ultimately executed. Madame Szabo gave a magnificent example of courage and steadfastness.

Violette Szabo was also awarded the Croix de Guerre (France). Her husband, Lieutenant Etienne Szabo (Free French Forces), was killed in action at El Alamein on 24 October 1942.

Szabo, VRE

Violette Szabo, GC on the Brookwood Memorial (Stephen Stratford 2010).

Violette Szabo is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial on Panel 26, Column 3.

In 1981 a Blue Plaque commemorating Violette's life was unveiled at the house in Stockwell (London), that had been occupied by Violette Szabo, her parents and daughter.

Wing Commander Yeo-Thomas

Click here to read the details of Wing Commander Yeo-Thomas' George Cross.

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